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04
Apr

5 steps to maximise the impact of your assessment data



Andy Goodeve

Written by Andy Goodeve

Andy is our Head of Pedagogical Services with extensive experience in education leadership across a range of socially challenging diverse schools in varying locations. His experience includes differing age ranges including secondary, middle, primary and junior schools.

The core purpose of using assessment and feedback is to to inform teaching and learning. Teachers can find out what their pupils do and do not know, enabling them to tailor their lessons accordingly. But how can this be put into practice?

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Here are 5 steps to help you on your way:

Best practices - ideally, schools should put processes in place which are consistent.  Assessments are standardised and moderated, ensuring a clear understanding by all teachers.  2. Curriculum and assessment overview - different pupils learn different things, in different ways and at a different pace, so evolve pupil progress meetings to ensure their personal gaps in learning are identified by reviewing:  Aspects of the curriculum which are particularly well taught or are in need of development planning by individual teachers What aspects of the previously taught curriculum needs to be retaught to the whole class. Also which skills need to be revisited with individual pupils to secure their progress and provide a solid foundation for future learning The specific interventions needed beyond the classroom where pupils are not making the required progress  3. Potential aspects for re-teaching - look at the actions that are required to secure the progress of pupils who may be in need of additional support, and undertake an analysis of pupil groups, including pupil premium performance. Progress meetings should have the aim of improving outcomes for pupils.  A professional discussion identifying the key areas for re-teaching in each class should occur.  4. The class teacher takes the lead - on different approaches which could be used in the re-teaching, of aspects of the curriculum that have been identified as not having been effectively learnt. Encourage the class teacher to lead the discussion for their class, as they know their pupils the best. Which pupils show limited knowledge, skill or understanding and how this will be addressed in future teaching. Note which pupils may require extra support beyond the classroom, which may be provided through bespoke intervention programmes.  By empowering the class teacher, the number of interventions outside the classroom reduces over time as the impact of what is happening in the classroom improves.   5. Monitor the impact - the class teacher is responsible for re-teaching agreed skills and should monitor the impact of these interventions. The impact of the re-teaching is shared and used to plan forward.  By collecting and using data and assessments effectively, it can have a huge impact and be of greater value to the learner against agreed curriculum skills. Assessment data is more than analysis and creating multi coloured filed reports. Effectively using data improves teaching and learning.

1. Best practices - ideally, schools should put processes in place which are consistent.  Assessments are standardised and moderated, ensuring a clear understanding by all teachers.

2. Curriculum and assessment overview - different pupils learn different things, in different ways and at a different pace, so evolve pupil progress meetings to ensure their personal gaps in learning are identified by reviewing:

  • Aspects of the curriculum which are particularly well taught or are in need of development planning by individual teachers
  • What aspects of the previously taught curriculum needs to be retaught to the whole class. Also which skills need to be revisited with individual pupils to secure their progress and provide a solid foundation for future learning
  • The specific interventions needed beyond the classroom where pupils are not making the required progress 

3. Potential aspects for re-teaching - look at the actions that are required to secure the progress of pupils who may be in need of additional support, and undertake an analysis of pupil groups, including pupil premium performance. Progress meetings should have the aim of improving outcomes for pupils.  A professional discussion identifying the key areas for re-teaching in each class should occur.

4. The class teacher takes the lead - on different approaches which could be used in the re-teaching, of aspects of the curriculum that have been identified as not having been effectively learnt. Encourage the class teacher to lead the discussion for their class, as they know their pupils the best. Which pupils show limited knowledge, skill or understanding and how this will be addressed in future teaching. Note which pupils may require extra support beyond the classroom, which may be provided through bespoke intervention programmes.  By empowering the class teacher, the number of interventions outside the classroom reduces over time as the impact of what is happening in the classroom improves. 

5. Monitor the impact - the class teacher is responsible for re-teaching agreed skills and should monitor the impact of these interventions. The impact of the re-teaching is shared and used to plan forward.

By collecting and using data and assessments effectively, it can have a huge impact and be of greater value to the learner against agreed curriculum skills. Assessment data is more than analysis and creating multi coloured filed reports. Effectively using data improves teaching and learning.

You can read more from me regarding my views and opinions on education right here on the InfoMentor blog. You can also find out more about InfoMentor - a teaching and learning resource that has been specifically designed to make life easier for schools by tackling workload for the modern teacher. You can download white papersview case studies and request a demo.

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